Published On: Sun, Mar 21st, 2021

The 5 most misunderstood things about CBD explained

 There are so many confusing myths and misconceptions about CBD on the Internet. It is time to set them straight once and for all. Keep reading below to find out what are the five most misunderstood things about this natural remedy and the truth about them! 

You hear medical specialists talking about it, you’ve seen posts from your virtual friends on social media, and likely also heard some people on the TV mentioning CBD. Now, you may be wondering, “why is everybody talking about CBD?”. 

Well, buckle up because you’re in for an interesting ride. 

CBD has enjoyed massive popularity over the past couple of years. Brands from all industries have started to add this compound to their products as soon as many medical specialists became vocal about all its benefits. Today, it’s enough to take a walk through your favorite supermarket’s aisles, and you’ll see that CBD is now being added to anything from foods to drinks, cosmetics, body lotions, and even toothpicks.  

Now, probably, the more you hear about CBD, the more confused you are because there are so many opposing opinions on what it is, what it does to the body, and whether or not it is a legit product or a marketing scam. 

Well, don’t you worry! We’re here to help you clear up some of the misconceptions you’ve likely heard about CBD! 

Image source: https://unsplash.com/photos/tCZVzr9TvxQ

  1. CBD gets you high

This one is definitely the most widespread misconception about CBD. Guess what? It isn’t true! 

Now, it can be understandable that people simply assume that CBD can get them “high” since they know that CBD comes from the cannabis plant. Yet, the truth is that that’s not what CBD does. On the contrary, CBD acts more as a blocker of THC, which is actually the compound that gives people feelings of euphoria. 

So, the two are different: THC and CBD both come from the cannabis or hemp plant. Yet, THC is the one that induces the euphoric feeling that people experience when using cannabis products. 

Now, the small detail that is often overlooked or unknown is the fact that CBD products do not contain more than 0,3% THC, as required by the law. And, that’s not enough to get you high. 

  1. CBD is not psychoactive

Here comes the complicated part of understanding what CBD does to the body. We’ve already explained to you why it doesn’t give you the “high” feeling, simply because it doesn’t have this ability. Yet, it’s also wrong to say that CBD is not psychoactive

CBD advocates who claim that CBD doesn’t get you high often also wrongfully claim that this compound isn’t psychoactive. But that isn’t true. Here’s why. 

Although it doesn’t produce the high associated with CBD, it has been shown to help with depression, anxiety, and seizures by having some form of impact on our brain molecules. But so does caffeine, which is a substance that also falls into the psychoactive category. 

  1. CBD is illegal

This one is another major CBD misconception. Once again, this misconception comes from the fact that CBD comes from the cannabis plant. Yet, what people seem to forget, or not know, is the fact that CBD can also be extracted from the hemp plant. 

Now, here’s the deal: All hemp-derived CBD products became legal across the US in 2018 thanks to the Farm Bill, which changed the status of CBD and legalized hemp cultivation across the country. From that moment on, hemp cultivation, as well as hemp-derived CBD products, became completely legal. Yet, this, once again, is true only if the CBD products contain no more than 0,3% THC. Legit and legal hemp growers sell CBD oil, CBD flower, CBD tinctures, or other products that contain 0,3% or less THC. 

Yet, there’s also a trick here worth mentioning: in states where recreational and medicinal marijuana use is legal, cannabis-derived CBD products are also legal. 

  1. CBD doesn’t do anything

If you’ve done your research on the Internet about CBD and read some reviews about CBD products, you’ve likely seen some opposing experiences with this compound. Some people report that CBD has helped them with their medical condition, while others say that CBD doesn’t actually do anything. 

Well, the answer to this one isn’t that straightforward. Whether or not CBD will do anything to you depends on multiple factors. More precisely, here are some reasons why you may not feel anything when using CBD:

  • You didn’t buy your product from a reliable provider (maybe the provider sells products that don’t have high-quality CBD).
  • You didn’t take CBD for long enough to see an improvement (it isn’t unusual for people not to see instant results with CBD. Maybe your body needs more time to absorb it)
  • You need to increase your dosage of CBD (maybe you need to increase your dosage to see an improvement). 
  • You don’t suffer from an illness that CBD can treat.
  • You need to take CBD in a different form (for example, if you are using oil but feel no effect of CBD, a different form such as a tincture or vape oil may work better for you).
  • It doesn’t work for you. 

Yes, it can be possible for CBD to not be right for you. This can depend on your level of absorption and reaction to CBD, which is determined by factors such as metabolism, biochemistry, or genetics. 

 So, it’s wrong to believe that CBD doesn’t do anything at all. Some consumers report many health benefits of CBD. 

  1. CBD is just a marketing scam

As with any other “miracle” product that sees a marketing buzz, skeptics will try to convince others that there’s nothing more than a marketing scam behind all that popularity. 

Well, that’s not the case with CBD. Why are we saying this? Because there are actually several medical studies and research that support the potential health benefits of CBD. Such studies suggest that CBD can help with various medical conditions, including anxiety and depression, epilepsy, chronic pain, heart conditions, acne, and even cancer treatment-related symptoms. 

Still not convinced? Find out that, in 2018, FDA approved the first CBD oral solution as a treatment for two uncommon forms of epilepsy. 

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